Bright idea: SendSocial

Name: SendSocial

Bright idea: Sendsocial
Name: Sendsocial
Launched: Yesterday
What is it, then?
A 'revolutionary' new way to send packages and parcels, the idea is you don't need to know someone's physical address to send them a present.
Eh?
All you need to do is enter their Twitter username or email address. The system then sends them a Tweet or an email asking whether they would like to receive the package, and where they would like to receive it. A courier picks it up and delivers it within five working days.
Very clever. But isn't that a tiny bit, er, stalky?
Yes, a tiny bit. Next question.
Ok. Who's involved?
The people behind the company are entrepreneurs from all over the country - from Newcastle to London - and there's even someone from Denmark. The company's chief executive is 27-year-old Glen Richardson from Barrow-in-Furness - but most notably, the company has engaged the services of the insurmountable Ben Way.
Ben Way? Haven't I heard that name before?
Why yes, there's a good chance you have. The diminutive serial entrepreneur is probably most notable for appearing in the Sunday Times Rich List on the same day he couldn't afford a tube ticket after he fell out with investors aged just 19, but he's also appeared on the Secret Millionaire and is behind a number of other tech companies. It was Way who came up with the idea of promising 100 Twitter users a stake in SendSocial if they tweeted about it.
Really? What happened with that?
Way originally asked for feedback on the idea back in March, before asking for further feedback. He then sent out a message promising 10% of SendSocial's shares to anyone who retweeted him. 148 people responded - although just 111 answered a request to register at a shareholders' portal.
Giving 10% of the equity away? Does he realise there's a recession on?
He may have given away 10% of the company in one fell swoop - but he also gained valuable feedback on his idea, as well as lots and lots of delicious publicity.
I suppose. They've been good on timing as well.
They have, haven't they? With postal strikes having conveniently destroyed public faith in Royal Mail and Christmas due to drop in t-minus 30 days, I'd say the timing was downright serendipitous.

Launched: Yesterday

What is it, then?

A 'revolutionary' new way to send packages and parcels, the idea is you don't need to know someone's physical address to send them a present.

Eh?

All you need to do is enter their Twitter username or email address. The system then sends them a Tweet or an email asking whether they would like to receive the package, and where they would like to receive it. A courier picks it up and delivers it within five working days.

Very clever. But isn't that a tiny bit, er, stalky?

Yes, a tiny bit. Not as stalky as Foursquare, though. Next question.

Ok. Who's involved?

The people behind the company are entrepreneurs from all over the country - from Newcastle to London - and there's even someone from Denmark. The company's chief executive is 27-year-old Glen Richardson from Barrow-in-Furness - but most notably, the company has engaged the services of the insurmountable Ben Way.

Ben Way? Haven't I heard that name before?

Why yes, there's a good chance you have. The diminutive serial entrepreneur is probably most notable for appearing in the Sunday Times Rich List on the same day he couldn't afford a tube ticket after he fell out with investors aged just 19, but he's also appeared on the Secret Millionaire and is behind a number of other tech companies. It was Way who came up with the idea of promising 100 Twitter users a stake in SendSocial if they tweeted about it.

Really? What happened there?

Way originally asked for feedback on the idea back in March. He then sent out a message promising 10% of SendSocial's shares to anyone who retweeted him. 148 people responded - although just 111 answered a request to register at a shareholders' portal.

Giving 10% of equity away? Doesn't he realise there's a recession on?

He may have given away 10% of the company in one fell swoop - but he also gained valuable feedback on his idea, as well as lots and lots of delicious publicity, and credibility from the Twittering classes.

I suppose. They've been good on timing as well.

They have, haven't they? With postal strikes having conveniently destroyed public faith in Royal Mail and Christmas due to drop in t-minus 30 days, I'd say the timing was downright serendipitous.

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