You're missing the point, Vince

Firstly, he is a seasoned entrepreneur with a real knack for slashing spending without cutting jobs. Secondly, he has an international outlook. His business interests in Europe and across the Atlantic give him a unique insight into Britain as a member of the global community.

For years, entrepreneurs have complained that government doesn't listen to their needs, doesn't draw on their expertise to make UK plc an economic force to be reckoned with. The appointment of Alan Sugar to the much-publicised enterprise tsar role marked a turn in the tide. Next up, Martha Lane Fox was installed as digital champion. Baby steps, but evidence of a real willingness from the powers that be to utilise this untapped resource.
Yes, the government have latched on to celebrity figures. They haven't gone for the unsung heroes and they have milked the headlines dry. But it is still a step in the right direction, surely?
Now, Whitehall has drafted in Arcadia boss Philip Green to advise on cutting spending. This is a stroke of genius for a number of reasons. Firstly, he is a seasoned entrepreneur with a real knack for slashing spending without cutting jobs. Secondly, he has an international outlook. His business interests in Europe and across the Atlantic give him a unique insight into Britain as a member of the global community. And why has nobody talked about the fact that he's not being paid? Can you imagine the consultancy fee for getting Green to go through your balance sheet with a fine-tooth comb? Our public sector is getting all this good stuff gratis.
What about his tax avoidance, you ask? Yes, Green has taken advantage of offshore tax arrangements to avoid paying over a billion notes to the treasury. Yes, this has put a few noses out of joint. But you cannot deny that it is this business nous that makes him so desirable as an advisor.
Yesterday, business secretary Vince Cable lambasted government for appointing the Topshop owner. Vince told City Am: "I remain of the general view that British businesspeople should pay their taxes in Britain. I'd have thought the point was clear that at a time when the government has an enormous deficit to deal with, we can't afford to indulge tax avoidance."
I think you're missing the point here, Vince. Entrepreneurs like Green only moved their assets offshore as a result of tax hikes and a dearth of business incentives at home. Working closely with Green is an opportunity for you to find out how the big earners can be lured back to our shores. It's not a time for finger pointing and hot air.
For a moment there, a sort of Dunkirk spirit was evident in government. Danny Alexander, chief secretary to the treasury said: "Tough decisions need to be taken in order to ensure that Britain lives within its means. By being prepared to do things differently, we can ensure that this process will enable us to get more for less, and support our front line services."
Differences were being put aside for the greater good of Britain. It was inspiring to hear Green's commitment to his new role: "I will give this efficiency review my very best effort knowing how hugely important it is to the recovery of the country. I want to help focus, motivate and energize to achieve these efficiency savings.  It is these actions that will re-start growth in the UK."
Green has precious little time to make his recommendations to Whitehall - the review will be published on October 20 this year. Let's hold off the naysaying and backbiting for this tiny window, a month or so.
Who knows, this newfound kinship between government and enterprise could yield real results for our green and pleasant land.Firstly, he is a seasoned entrepreneur with a real knack for slashing spending without cutting jobs. Secondly, he has an international outlook. His business interests in Europe and across the Atlantic give him a unique insight into Britain as a member of the global community.

And why has nobody talked about the fact that he's not being paid? Can you imagine the consultancy fee for getting Green to go through your balance sheet with a fine-tooth comb? Our public sector is getting all this good stuff gratis.

What about his tax avoidance, you ask? Yes, Green has taken advantage of offshore tax arrangements to avoid paying over a billion notes to the treasury. Yes, this has put a few noses out of joint. But you cannot deny that it is this business nous that makes him so desirable as an advisor.

Yesterday, business secretary Vince Cable lambasted government for appointing the Topshop owner. Vince told City Am: "I remain of the general view that British businesspeople should pay their taxes in Britain. I'd have thought the point was clear that at a time when the government has an enormous deficit to deal with, we can't afford to indulge tax avoidance."

I think you're missing the point here, Vince.

Entrepreneurs like Green only moved their assets offshore as a result of tax hikes and a dearth of business incentives at home. Working closely with Green is an opportunity for you to find out how the big earners can be lured back to our shores. It's not a time for finger pointing and hot air.

For a moment there, a sort of Dunkirk spirit was evident in government. Danny Alexander, chief secretary to the treasury said: "Tough decisions need to be taken in order to ensure that Britain lives within its means. By being prepared to do things differently, we can ensure that this process will enable us to get more for less, and support our front line services."

Differences were being put aside for the greater good of Britain. It was inspiring to hear Green's commitment to his new role: "I will give this efficiency review my very best effort knowing how hugely important it is to the recovery of the country. I want to help focus, motivate and energize to achieve these efficiency savings.  It is these actions that will re-start growth in the UK."

Green has precious little time to make his recommendations to Whitehall - the review will be published on October 20 this year. Let's hold off the naysaying and backbiting for this tiny window, a month or so.

Who knows, this newfound kinship between government and enterprise could yield real results for our green and pleasant land.

By Rebecca Burn-Callander

 

 

We use cookies to create the most secure and effective website possible for our customers. Full details can be found here